Faith and the Feminist World

 

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On a August night several years ago, I had a strange feeling come over me. A feeling of euphoria beyond anything else I had ever felt. It scared me. What was I feeling? What was going on? Why now? What’s wrong? After a few days of thought, and the feeling remaining, I came to a very abnormal thought for me: maybe its God? Soon, I was on a path of books and anxiety, and a long road towards rock bottom.

The matter of faith and religion on the internet is as dangerous as promoting the KKK in South Side. I’m not here to push what I believe, explain its theories or convert anyone to anything. Others’ beliefs have no effect on me, unless they decide to make it a problem. I have my opinions and you have yours.

I’m bringing up faith and religion on a blog about sex and manliness because, like it or not, for a very long time, these two things were a staple of what it meant to be masculine. “God-fearing man” was a snippet a prospective wife loved to hear. A strong family bond came from the church as well as good parenting. Community, tribe, all met up under a religious banner.

This still happens, but it is slipping, and I think its a good thing.

The modern Christian world has slipped into the abyss of political sensitivity and unnatural equality. Read Dalrock for an up close view of this infection:

The United States is frequently pointed out as being as the most religiously conservative nation in the western world when it comes to sexual morality, and indeed there are stats to back this up. If you ask the average American who are the most zealous Christians fighting against feminism and for the family as defined in the Bible?, they will almost undoubtedly respond with some combination of Focus on the Family, the Southern Baptists, and Pat Robertson’s CBN & The 700 Club. These are the groups Americans, the religious fundamentalists of the western world, see as the most extreme defenders of the traditional family. Yet as I’ve shown the Director for Family Formation Studies at Focus on the Family calls unwed mothers heroic, explains that women deliberately having children out of wedlock is proof that men aren’t worthy, and tells parents that their daughters have an innate goodness which their sons lack.

In short, you can’t trust a church to back you up in the face of feminism’s horde.

The same thing is happening in my spiritual sector. The Orthodox Church, and its leader the Patriarch of Constantinople, His All Holiness Bartholomew I, is riding political correctness and opportunity for the sake of PR. He is known as the “Green Patriarch”, a man of God and the environment. While the Patriarch preens over trees, he has either ignored or kept quiet on the increasing threat to Orthodoxy by Turkey and its ever darkening slide to Islamism. Of course, its not like the Turks will hand back Istanbul (formerly Constantinople, the heart of Orthodoxy) after hundreds of years of ownership, but placating your occupiers and their abuses isn’t exactly the best way to keep the faithful on your side. The Turks ability to keep their crimes quiet disappeared with the invention of the internet. The only place where we can see a strengething of Orthodoxy’s balls is Russia, and the entanglement of the authoritarian state and the church is never a good sign. The small gains of power-lust priests will backfire as Russian geo-political power increase. The faithful will not win.

What does this all mean for a man of faith (or for some of you, a lack of)?

Independence.

When I began my exploration of faith, I fell in to the trap of believing every word that I heard from “experts”. Heretics this, wrongness that. Mortal sins made of modern morality instead of cold tradition. Guilt overload, especially with the ex leaving. And when she left, I tossed my books away and thought it was all a sham. I was wrong to do that. It felt good to believe. It felt good to have belief. Its been a feeling I’ve had even when I swore up and down that my woes were God’s fault. With everything else I’ve been returning to, a retrospect into my faith had to come as well. And it dug up this:

There is no better time, nor any better reason, for those who do believe in a established religion, or for those who have more eclectic views, to tell the Old World to go fuck itself. One part of being a man is standing up for your beliefs. NOT someone else’s. NOT your wife’s. NOT the priest’s. YOURS. Refuse to rely on the powers that be and, like education, begin at home. Do not wrestle with the word of your faith and the word of your faith’s so-called leadership. The modern world has desecrated what used to be a home for ideas of masculinity and community. Your home is your church. Your family your flock. Take what you believe and make it doctrine. Enjoy your religious freedom as it was meant to be enjoyed: freely. We don’t have to be stuck between the fascists of extreme atheism or extreme religion. We can just believe whatever the fuck we want, what fits our views, and tell the rest of the politically stained bile that calls itself the West to back off.

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One response to “Faith and the Feminist World

  1. Brother,

    I hear you but don’t despair over Orthodoxy. The hierarchy is a mess – politics, trendy nonsense, ethnonationalism, the usual stuff – but really it always has been. The genius of Orthodoxy, why it is the True Faith, is the laity – who are the real defenders of Orthodoxy.

    Never forget that, at the end of the 16th century, when bishops in Poland (mostly today’s Ukraine) sold out Orthodoxy by accepting union with Rome (the so-called Uniate heresy), the bishops were killed – literally torn apart – by the faithful.

    I’m not advocating killing, or even harming, our bishops, some of whom are wingnuts, but always remember that as long as the faithful stick to Orthodoxy, what the bishops do matters less – a lot less in, say, Roman Catholicism and all versions of “Christianity” where clericalism rules.

    I know stupid clergy, I know smart clergy. Pray for them and don’t take ANY of them seriously when they discuss ANY non-theological matters, until you’ve assessed them.

    Peace out … J

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